Lifetime Achievement Award for David Vinden

The British Kodály Academy is delighted to announce that one of its long term members, David Vinden, has been awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award in the Rhinegold Music Teacher Awards for Excellence.

David has worked tirelessly for the Kodály cause for most of his adult life. He is one of the BKA’s most popular tutors, always giving generously of his time and immense knowledge.

Accepting the award, David said, “If I could bring about one thing in education it would be the belief that all children should have music and that it should start as early as possible through singing.”

Huge congratulations to David from everyone at the BKA. You rock!!

First Thing Music

BKA Member Lindsay Ibbotson has been successful in gaining funding for “First Thing Music”, an exciting research project which will run during the school year 2018/19,  jointly supported by The Education Endowment Foundation and The Royal Society of Arts in partnership with, Tees Valley Music Service, the Institute of Education and the British Kodály Academy.

Primary Schools in Teeside and the North East are invited to consider taking part in this exciting and important project.  Please see FTM Info Pack Jan 2018 for details.

For more information please contact Lindsay on liftm@tvms.org.uk

Sing ARound

 

Sing ARound – Sunday 4th March 2018 and Tuesday 6th March 2018
2017 saw the start of the special memorial year – 135 years of the birth of Zoltán Kodály and 50 years since his death. As we near the end of this special year the British Kodály Academy would like to organise Sing ARound events around the country – it would be great to have 50 events! Even better to have 135!

How can you help?
Simply organise a local event in your area:
It can be any kind of event you want – provided there is singing involved! An informal gathering to sing a few canons, a group of children or adults having fun playing singing games or a full day training event. The choice is yours.

Why Sing ARound
The British Kodály Academy would like to promote the importance of singing and Kodály education especially in this special commemoration year. It would be great if a donation from each event could be sent to the British Kodály Academy to raise funds – any donation from the event is valuable to us in order to help us continue to offer training around the country. (If you would like us to organise a training event in your area, please let us know. Contact education@kodaly.org.uk for any further information)

Can schools get involved? 
Absolutely – this is why we have suggested Tuesday 6th March as an alternative date – It’s a school day! We don’t expect a donation from any school event – just have fun singing!

Please send us a photo of your event – we would love to see what happened around the country. Send any photographs you have to education@kodaly.org.uk

To help you advertise your event we have made a generic leaflet. Download here
Simply add description of event, time and venue!

HAVE FUN!

Kodály on the BBC!

KODÁLY FEATURED ON BBC’S THE ONE SHOW

Update: Watch again on BBC iPlayer http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09gsfbb

In a very exciting move for the BKA, this Tuesday, 28th November, the BBC’s One Show will feature one of our members, and the great success he has had teaching music in a school in Bradford.

Jimmy Rotheram is the music coordinator in Feversham Primary School, an inner-city school, which was in special measures five years ago. Their success is down to one thing – the Kodály concept of music education. By giving all pupils access to this incredible way of teaching music, they have improved attendance, creativity, concentration and confidence, and produced some musicians of exceptional quality.

But it is not just in music that they have seen this success. Just as was seen in schools in Hungary, there has been a knock-on effect in other academic subjects. The improvements in mathematics and literacy have lifted the school out of special measures, and they are now significantly above the national average.

Following a recent article in The Guardian, which has been shared almost 200,000 times on social media, there was so much interest that the school had to run a conference to showcase their music making.

Happy children, great academic results, fabulous music-making. This is a real success story we can all be proud of.

Find out more about the Kodály Approach with our “Your Questions Answered” page

The One Show – BBC1 Tuesday 28th November 2017 at 7pm

View The Guardian article here: https://www.theguardian.com/education/2017/oct/03/school-results-music-bradford

Plus a feature on Adrian Chiles’ BBC Radio 5 Live programme – the feature is about 1 hour in http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b09gfy6t

Paul Wilson

Paul Guitar c DaveGreen

Paul is a professional music educator, composer, singer and song-writer, with thirty years’ experience. As a music educator with Marilyn Tucker, he co-founded Wren Music, which now serves over 30,000 people a year from its base in Devon. He regularly writes articles and gives talks on folk music and education. His dedication to preserving, maintaining and creating traditional music was recognised in 2002 with the award of an Honorary MA in Music Education by the University of Plymouth. He is the course director for the new level 4 Trinity course Certificate for Music Educators delivered by Wren Music.

www.wrenmusic.co.uk

Kodály Summer School 2017 – Talk 1

Mother Tongues and Other Tongues

Singing Songs In Foreign Languages

Paul Wilson

This talk will take a broad and informed perspective on the perennially ‘tricky’ subject of singing and teaching songs in foreign languages. In a world where English as a language is taken to the remotest corners of the world through internet and social media use, how should we approach the learning and teaching of songs in tongues which are not our own?

There is no question that in the past, perhaps in our desire to promote songs in other languages, we have been cavalier. Many influential organisations singing leaders and publishing houses have approached the understanding of foreign texts with an amazing lack of care and respect. To begin to address this positively and work towards a more genuinely inclusive song culture for our society, we will aim to provide a few key pointers towards building a code of practice.

We want to enjoy singing in other tongues, especially with the possibilities now opening up with new media, but we need to accord the other tongues the basic respect they deserve and that we would want for our own. The talk will contain many ideas which are highly transferable. It is not necessary of course to run a whole project or even a whole concert around this concept, but the sequences of activity can be employed anywhere for anyone wishing to approach a song in a foreign language.

Delegates will be invited to get their tongues round a few tricky sounds from another tongue – from listening to recordings of first language speakers – lots of fun!!

Kodály Summer School 2017 – Talk 2

Centuries of Song

A romp through the timeline of English Folk Song

Paul Wilson

The talk will take selected significant events over the last half millennium or so, to provide a birds eye view of what we now describe as English Folk Music. Of necessity we will stop a little longer with significant signposts and watersheds.

We will flag the 17th and 18th century European philosophers and writers like Herder and Bishop Percy and their search for national identities. Compare the ballad anthologists and commentators. We will ride around 19th and early 20th century Devon and Somerset with collectors like Sabine Baring Gould and Cecil Sharp. We will find out why latter day collectors were keen to visit working men’s clubs and gipsy encampments and bring things right up to date with the description of new initiatives which are being created through internet resources and public funding. The talk will touch on some scarcely believable truths and may explode some long standing and credible myths and will feature historical musical examples sung live alongside audio from more recent collecting.

We will consider how much or little of this work is being applied to educational situations and how the current scene is one of unrivalled opportunity for music educators interested in bringing forward English Folk song with their young people.

Finally, there’ll be lots of opportunity for discussion and sharing of perspectives on this fascinating and often hidden raft of treasures.

copyright – Paul Wilson

July 2017

Ben Lawrence

Ben LawrenceBen divides his week by managing Calderdale’s Public Children’s Library Service and being the Early Years Librarian, a job he finds incredibly rewarding. He loves sharing his passions for music and literature with the families in and around Halifax, West Yorkshire. He is also chair of both Yorkshire and Humber Youth Libraries Group and the Kirklees and Calderdale Children’s Bookgroup.

Ben studied music at the University of Huddersfield, studying viola with Helen Brackley Jones, and graduated in 2008. After graduation, he continued his studies with Sarah-Jane Bradley. He is a member of the British Kodály Academy, and endeavours to apply Kodály’s philosophy of music education in all his sessions. In 2013, Ben was awarded the Cecilia Vajda Memorial Scholarship to further his studies at the British Kodály Academy Summer School.

Ben, with his colleague Shelley Bullas, co-authored the chapter Music and Rhyme Time Sessions for the Early Years in the book Library Services from Birth to Five – Delivering the Best Start, edited Carolynn Rankin and Avril Brock.

Ben regularly presents at conferences and delivers training on using songs and rhymes for Children Centre and Early Years staff as well as Children’s Library professionals. In 2014 Ben was invited to speak about the power of sharing songs, rhymes and stories at an MP’s reception at the Houses of Parliament. More recently, Ben has recorded songs and rhymes for the charity Booktrust, for their National Bookstart Week celebrations.

Ben sings with, and is administrator for, the Northern Kodály Choir based in Huddersfield. He LOVES playing viola, and can be found playing regularly for Espressivo Chorus and the Fields Ensemble.

London Adventist Chorale

LAC_photoThe London Adventist Chorale was formed in 1981, to bring together and develop the latent talents of singers from various Seventh-day Adventist Churches. Its current principal conductor is Ken Burton, who has conducted the choir for over two decades.

The choir’s first artistic director was the late John Tolman, who laid out the vision for the choir: high-standard performance of varied and challenging sacred repertoire, with a heavy leaning toward a cappella music. Fundamental to the original vision was that the choir would be of a standard to “stand before kings and queens”, a statement borrowed from a Bible verse.

Throughout its years, under several directors including Derek Hoyte and Tina Brooks, this dream has been realised; the choir has made a strong impact on the choral world internationally through its moving performances, combining, as one music critic put it, “discipline with fervour”. Its repertoire over the years has included music in Hebrew, African-American Spirituals, close harmony, and Western choral music from Renaissance through to new commissions.

The Chorale’s performances have been experienced by tens of millions world-wide on stage, screen, recordings and radio appearances. The choir has performed in most of the UK’s major performance venues. Among the many notable venues and performance are Blenheim Palace in the presence of former US President Bill Clinton, Buckingham Palace on the occasion of Her Majesty the Queen’s Golden Jubilee, Toronto’s Sky Dome before an audience of seventy thousand, and BBC Proms concerts. Its performances very often receive long standing ovations, and one Times reviewer was so taken aback, he wrote in the newspaper that he had found “the perfect choir”.

In 1994, the choir won the prestigious “Choir of The Year” title, and was awarded BBC UK Gospel Choir of the Year by the BBC a year later. Even to the present day, many of the UK’s choral directors have verbally stated that the London Adventist Chorale has had a profound effect and influence on the UK choral scene. By way of example, it is not uncommon to see the inclusion of African-American Spirituals – a genre which has been almost unilaterally preserved in the UK by the Chorale – on choral programmes and in competition repertoire. The choir has worked in collaboration with a number of notable artists including Bryn Terfel CBE, Sir Willard White, Larnelle Harris, Wynton Marsalis, Wilhelmenia Fernandez and Lesley Garrett.

The choir performs yearly Christmas concerts at the Clonter Opera Theatre and celebrity chef Raymond Blanc’s Le Manoir Aux Quat’Saisons. It has also been involved with the Kijani Kenya Trust which raises funds for HIV,Aids and Conservation projects in Kenya, through a high-calibre music festival and ongoing education programme.

Recordings to date include the debut album “Turn Your Eyes Upon Jesus”, “Deep River”, “Steal Away” (EMI), and “Live In Australia”.

Ken Burton

Ken Burton_photoKen Burton started his musical training at a very young age, playing piano, descant and alto recorder, violin and steel pans in his primary school and at church. He then entered Trinity School, with its acclaimed boys choir, for whom he played on a number of occasions. After his schooling, Ken pursued his BMus degree at Goldsmith’s College, University of London, and undertook professional development studies in music education, specialising in vocal coaching.

As a performer, Ken has conducted, played, sung and made many radio and television appearances at all the leading U.K. venues, as well as in Europe, Africa, Asia, North America and Australia. On an orchestral level, Ken has conducted the London Mozart Players, and members of the RPO and RLPO.

Ken’s choral activities began when he was nine years old, by accompanying the Croydon SDA Youth Choir (now the Croydon SDA Gospel Choir), and at fifteen directing the choir. Choral activities became a more integral part of Ken’s musical life, and he was accompanist for the Goldsmiths’ College Chorus, and singer in the Goldsmiths’ Chamber Choir. After completing his initial studies, Ken was appointed chorus master of the Goldsmiths’ Chorus, and, subsequently Musical Director of the Goldsmiths’ Chamber Choir. In 1990, Ken was invited to join Derek Hoyte as director of the London Adventist Chorale. He has enjoyed success in a number of competitions and awards, namely the Sainsbury’s Choir of the Year, won by the London Adventist Chorale in 1994, with the Croydon SDA Gospel Choir in second place, out of a total of 306 Choirs. The London Adventist Chorale was also voted BBC UK Gospel Choir of the year in 1995, and the Croydon SDA Gospel Choir has enjoyed first place in local music festivals.

As a recording musician, Ken’s activities have been extensive. His first recording was with Gospel band, Ekklesia, in 1986, with an album release mostly containing Ken’s original pieces. Further recordings have been made with choirs and bands. Among them are Croydon SDA Gospel Choir’s Until We Reach, Perfect Love, and The Very Best of Gospel; the London Adventist Chorale’s Deep River and Steal Away; Graham Kendrick’s Rumours 0f Angels, and Illuminations, Southampton Community Gospel Choir’s Southern Praise (a commission). Ken is continually working on a number of projects.

Radio and television broadcasts have been numerous, not only in the U.K. but all over the world. Ken has conducted, performed, interviewed, and had his compositions of his own played on television and radio stations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, America, and Australia. Workshop activities are also very regular events for Ken. His workshops are in demand around the world, in Europe, America, The Caribbean and Africa. As a composer, his music is published by Faber Music. Currently, there are two volumes of arrangements for choir, the first – the best-selling –‘Feel the Spirit’, and the second, released in the new Millennium ‘Good News’. A third SATB volume will be available soon. In 1997, he was commissioned to write a Gospel work for the Southampton Community Gospel Choir. This was entitled Southern Praise, and the work received both television and radio coverage, as well as being recorded and released on CD. Ken’s compositions cover a broad range of musical styles and types, including orchestral, band, solo vocal works ranging from 17th century through to 20th century idiom, a cappella choral cantatas, jingles, and many more.

As an educator, Ken has led and continues to lead many workshops, seminars and lectures in concert halls, schools, colleges, universities, churches and to private choral groups, on an international level. In the course of his career, Ken has also served as head of music at a north London church school.

Currently, Ken teaches performance to students at John Ruskin College in Greater London, directs the chamber choir at Goldsmiths’ College University of London, adjudicates for competitions, including the BBC Television series ‘Choir 0f The Year’ and is musical director and orchestrator for several television programmes, including the BBC series, ‘Songs of Praise’.

Rhys and Owain Boorman

Rhys and Owain

At the 2017 Kodály Summer School, Rhys and Owain will present a fun and interactive introduction to Cotswold Morris Dance, the most graceful, dynamic and complex of the Morris Dance forms alive in England today. Morris Dancing has easy-to- grasp structures, which are filled with a vocabulary of steps and arm movements distinctive to each “tradition”, and a number of figures and group movements shared between traditions. We will learn one or two accessible dances to explore the beauty of this tradition.

Rhys and Owain Boorman have both been dancing since the age of 12; they are 24 now. Their first side was Mad Jack’s Morris from Hastings, which was their only team for six years before going to university. Since then, Rhys has joined various teams, notably Morris performance group: Morris Offspring and Molly Team: The Seven Champions Molly Dancers. With Morris Offspring he has performed on various stages, including the Royal Albert Hall for the 2014 Folk Awards and has performed in shows in America and Canada.

Owain was just as busy at university, joining and leading two sides in Southampton: Red Stags and King John’s, who dance Border and Cotswold Morris, respectively.  He also formed a new mixed Cotswold side in the Autumn of 2014 called Clausentum Morris.

Rhys and Owain won the famous John Gasson Double Jig Competition in 2015 representing Clausentum, with Owain winning the Solo competition that same year; Rhys was placed 2nd in 2015 and 2016.

Steve Roud

Steve Roud_photoSteve Roud is a retired Local History Librarian and now a freelance writer and researcher specialising in the social history of traditional song and other folkloric topics. His publications include The New Penguin Book of English Folk Songs, The Lore of the Playground, The English Year, and the Penguin Guide to the Superstitions of Britain and Ireland. He is also the creator of the internationally-used Folk Song Index online database.