Paul Wilson

Paul Guitar c DaveGreen

Paul is a professional music educator, composer, singer and song-writer, with thirty years’ experience. As a music educator with Marilyn Tucker, he co-founded Wren Music, which now serves over 30,000 people a year from its base in Devon. He regularly writes articles and gives talks on folk music and education. His dedication to preserving, maintaining and creating traditional music was recognised in 2002 with the award of an Honorary MA in Music Education by the University of Plymouth. He is the course director for the new level 4 Trinity course Certificate for Music Educators delivered by Wren Music.

www.wrenmusic.co.uk

Kodály Summer School 2017 – Talk 1

Mother Tongues and Other Tongues

Singing Songs In Foreign Languages

Paul Wilson

This talk will take a broad and informed perspective on the perennially ‘tricky’ subject of singing and teaching songs in foreign languages. In a world where English as a language is taken to the remotest corners of the world through internet and social media use, how should we approach the learning and teaching of songs in tongues which are not our own?

There is no question that in the past, perhaps in our desire to promote songs in other languages, we have been cavalier. Many influential organisations singing leaders and publishing houses have approached the understanding of foreign texts with an amazing lack of care and respect. To begin to address this positively and work towards a more genuinely inclusive song culture for our society, we will aim to provide a few key pointers towards building a code of practice.

We want to enjoy singing in other tongues, especially with the possibilities now opening up with new media, but we need to accord the other tongues the basic respect they deserve and that we would want for our own. The talk will contain many ideas which are highly transferable. It is not necessary of course to run a whole project or even a whole concert around this concept, but the sequences of activity can be employed anywhere for anyone wishing to approach a song in a foreign language.

Delegates will be invited to get their tongues round a few tricky sounds from another tongue – from listening to recordings of first language speakers – lots of fun!!

Kodály Summer School 2017 – Talk 2

Centuries of Song

A romp through the timeline of English Folk Song

Paul Wilson

The talk will take selected significant events over the last half millennium or so, to provide a birds eye view of what we now describe as English Folk Music. Of necessity we will stop a little longer with significant signposts and watersheds.

We will flag the 17th and 18th century European philosophers and writers like Herder and Bishop Percy and their search for national identities. Compare the ballad anthologists and commentators. We will ride around 19th and early 20th century Devon and Somerset with collectors like Sabine Baring Gould and Cecil Sharp. We will find out why latter day collectors were keen to visit working men’s clubs and gipsy encampments and bring things right up to date with the description of new initiatives which are being created through internet resources and public funding. The talk will touch on some scarcely believable truths and may explode some long standing and credible myths and will feature historical musical examples sung live alongside audio from more recent collecting.

We will consider how much or little of this work is being applied to educational situations and how the current scene is one of unrivalled opportunity for music educators interested in bringing forward English Folk song with their young people.

Finally, there’ll be lots of opportunity for discussion and sharing of perspectives on this fascinating and often hidden raft of treasures.

copyright – Paul Wilson

July 2017

Ben Lawrence

Ben LawrenceBen divides his week by managing Calderdale’s Public Children’s Library Service and being the Early Years Librarian, a job he finds incredibly rewarding. He loves sharing his passions for music and literature with the families in and around Halifax, West Yorkshire. He is also chair of both Yorkshire and Humber Youth Libraries Group and the Kirklees and Calderdale Children’s Bookgroup.

Ben studied music at the University of Huddersfield, studying viola with Helen Brackley Jones, and graduated in 2008. After graduation, he continued his studies with Sarah-Jane Bradley. He is a member of the British Kodály Academy, and endeavours to apply Kodály’s philosophy of music education in all his sessions. In 2013, Ben was awarded the Cecilia Vajda Memorial Scholarship to further his studies at the British Kodály Academy Summer School.

Ben, with his colleague Shelley Bullas, co-authored the chapter Music and Rhyme Time Sessions for the Early Years in the book Library Services from Birth to Five – Delivering the Best Start, edited Carolynn Rankin and Avril Brock.

Ben regularly presents at conferences and delivers training on using songs and rhymes for Children Centre and Early Years staff as well as Children’s Library professionals. In 2014 Ben was invited to speak about the power of sharing songs, rhymes and stories at an MP’s reception at the Houses of Parliament. More recently, Ben has recorded songs and rhymes for the charity Booktrust, for their National Bookstart Week celebrations.

Ben sings with, and is administrator for, the Northern Kodály Choir based in Huddersfield. He LOVES playing viola, and can be found playing regularly for Espressivo Chorus and the Fields Ensemble.

Ken Burton

Ken Burton_photoKen Burton started his musical training at a very young age, playing piano, descant and alto recorder, violin and steel pans in his primary school and at church. He then entered Trinity School, with its acclaimed boys choir, for whom he played on a number of occasions. After his schooling, Ken pursued his BMus degree at Goldsmith’s College, University of London, and undertook professional development studies in music education, specialising in vocal coaching.

As a performer, Ken has conducted, played, sung and made many radio and television appearances at all the leading U.K. venues, as well as in Europe, Africa, Asia, North America and Australia. On an orchestral level, Ken has conducted the London Mozart Players, and members of the RPO and RLPO.

Ken’s choral activities began when he was nine years old, by accompanying the Croydon SDA Youth Choir (now the Croydon SDA Gospel Choir), and at fifteen directing the choir. Choral activities became a more integral part of Ken’s musical life, and he was accompanist for the Goldsmiths’ College Chorus, and singer in the Goldsmiths’ Chamber Choir. After completing his initial studies, Ken was appointed chorus master of the Goldsmiths’ Chorus, and, subsequently Musical Director of the Goldsmiths’ Chamber Choir. In 1990, Ken was invited to join Derek Hoyte as director of the London Adventist Chorale. He has enjoyed success in a number of competitions and awards, namely the Sainsbury’s Choir of the Year, won by the London Adventist Chorale in 1994, with the Croydon SDA Gospel Choir in second place, out of a total of 306 Choirs. The London Adventist Chorale was also voted BBC UK Gospel Choir of the year in 1995, and the Croydon SDA Gospel Choir has enjoyed first place in local music festivals.

As a recording musician, Ken’s activities have been extensive. His first recording was with Gospel band, Ekklesia, in 1986, with an album release mostly containing Ken’s original pieces. Further recordings have been made with choirs and bands. Among them are Croydon SDA Gospel Choir’s Until We Reach, Perfect Love, and The Very Best of Gospel; the London Adventist Chorale’s Deep River and Steal Away; Graham Kendrick’s Rumours 0f Angels, and Illuminations, Southampton Community Gospel Choir’s Southern Praise (a commission). Ken is continually working on a number of projects.

Radio and television broadcasts have been numerous, not only in the U.K. but all over the world. Ken has conducted, performed, interviewed, and had his compositions of his own played on television and radio stations in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, America, and Australia. Workshop activities are also very regular events for Ken. His workshops are in demand around the world, in Europe, America, The Caribbean and Africa. As a composer, his music is published by Faber Music. Currently, there are two volumes of arrangements for choir, the first – the best-selling –‘Feel the Spirit’, and the second, released in the new Millennium ‘Good News’. A third SATB volume will be available soon. In 1997, he was commissioned to write a Gospel work for the Southampton Community Gospel Choir. This was entitled Southern Praise, and the work received both television and radio coverage, as well as being recorded and released on CD. Ken’s compositions cover a broad range of musical styles and types, including orchestral, band, solo vocal works ranging from 17th century through to 20th century idiom, a cappella choral cantatas, jingles, and many more.

As an educator, Ken has led and continues to lead many workshops, seminars and lectures in concert halls, schools, colleges, universities, churches and to private choral groups, on an international level. In the course of his career, Ken has also served as head of music at a north London church school.

Currently, Ken teaches performance to students at John Ruskin College in Greater London, directs the chamber choir at Goldsmiths’ College University of London, adjudicates for competitions, including the BBC Television series ‘Choir 0f The Year’ and is musical director and orchestrator for several television programmes, including the BBC series, ‘Songs of Praise’.

Rhys and Owain Boorman

Rhys and Owain

At the 2017 Kodály Summer School, Rhys and Owain will present a fun and interactive introduction to Cotswold Morris Dance, the most graceful, dynamic and complex of the Morris Dance forms alive in England today. Morris Dancing has easy-to- grasp structures, which are filled with a vocabulary of steps and arm movements distinctive to each “tradition”, and a number of figures and group movements shared between traditions. We will learn one or two accessible dances to explore the beauty of this tradition.

Rhys and Owain Boorman have both been dancing since the age of 12; they are 24 now. Their first side was Mad Jack’s Morris from Hastings, which was their only team for six years before going to university. Since then, Rhys has joined various teams, notably Morris performance group: Morris Offspring and Molly Team: The Seven Champions Molly Dancers. With Morris Offspring he has performed on various stages, including the Royal Albert Hall for the 2014 Folk Awards and has performed in shows in America and Canada.

Owain was just as busy at university, joining and leading two sides in Southampton: Red Stags and King John’s, who dance Border and Cotswold Morris, respectively.  He also formed a new mixed Cotswold side in the Autumn of 2014 called Clausentum Morris.

Rhys and Owain won the famous John Gasson Double Jig Competition in 2015 representing Clausentum, with Owain winning the Solo competition that same year; Rhys was placed 2nd in 2015 and 2016.

Gerard Klaassens

Gerard_photoGerard Klaassens lives in Limburg, in the South of Holland. He has a B.Ed. in Music Education and has studied solo singing. Since 1993 he has attended all the International Kodâly Seminars at the Kodály Institute of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music in Kecskemét, Hungary where he has attended many solo singing courses led by Dr.János Klézli and Roland Hadju.

Gerard teaches Kodály Musicianship and recorder at the Myouthic Institute for Art and Culture, Thorn and is also a music teacher at the Music Primary Schools of Hout-Blerick, Montfort and Linne. As a conductor, he directs a children’s choir, an adult choir and a concert band; his adult choir have performed in Poland, Vienna, Salzburg and Baden-Baden.

In Holland he is in demand as a lecturer in Primary Music Education and has given workshops on Kodály teaching at the Utrechts Conservatorim. Last August, he was invited to meet the Minister of Education to discuss music education in the South of Holland. Together with Paul Mestrom he has written a method for recorder based on Kodály principles and is now working on a book about music listening.

Gerard has a great interest in multicultural songs and has travelled (and continues to travel) to many different countries to collect songs.

Nicola Gaines

Nicola Gaines_photo

Exploring Rhythm and Phrasing through 17th Century (Playford) Dances
Nicola’s evening workshop at the BKA Summer School 2017. The workshop aims to combine fun with learning.

Nicola Gaines BPhil(Hons) LISTD CECCHETTI is a specialist performer and teacher of Early Dance.

A graduate of the London College of Dance and Drama, and the Royal Ballet School’s Teachers Training Course, she worked for many years with the late Belinda Quirey MBE. In 1998 she recorded a highly acclaimed video on Baroque dance with Christopher Tudor.

Nicola has worked and performed on numerous educational projects with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. She has also led educational projects for the Victoria & Albert Museum and Viva (East of England Orchestra). Nicola has also delivered workshops for EPTA, BKA and the Purcell School of Music

Nicola is the Dance Leader and Administrator for the Early Dance Faculty of the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dance and has taught and demonstrated Early Dance on numerous courses run for dancers and musicians.

Nicola is also a senior teacher for the Junior Associates Scheme at the Royal Ballet School where she is responsible for the use of Early Dance material in the JA training programme and performances.

Ralph Allwood MBE

Ralph Allwood MBE was for 26 years Director of Music at Eton College and is now a freelance choral director. He is the Director of the Eton Choral Courses, which he founded in 1980. Seven thousand 16 to 20 year olds have been students on courses over the last thirty-five years. He co-founded the Junior Choral Courses in 2012, and is now planning courses in Shanghai, Melbourne and Greenwich, Connecticut. The Rodolfus choir, made up of the best singers from the courses, has been described as ‘unspeakably beautiful’ by Gramophone. It has produced over 20 CDs.

Ralph is a founder and conductor of Inner Voices, a choir made up of singers from state schools in London. He has conducted choirs for 40 live broadcasts for BBC Radio 3, is a judge for the Llangollen Eisteddfod and Cork International Choral Competition and has written much music heard worldwide on radio and television.

Ralph adjudicates the Llangollen Eisteddfod and the Cork International Choral Competition. He is a Fellow Commoner advising in music at Music at Queens’ College, Cambridge, and an Honorary Fellow of University College, Durham. He is Choral Advisor to Novello, Wellington College and Trinity College, Oxford. He teaches at Trinity Laban Conservatoire and at his old school, Tiffin.

In 2012 Ralph was awarded a Doctorate of Music by Aberdeen University. He was made MBE in the 2012 New Year’s Honours list.

Jacqueline Vann

Jacqueline VannDalcroze: using movement in Aural Training
Jacqueline’s afternoon workshop at the Kodály Summer School 2017

This session will look at some of the ways movement is used within the context of an aural training session. Sometimes as an expressive tool, sometimes as a quick reaction game, sometimes as a means of engaging more with the music and sometimes to show the music in space. The class will include games and exercises to do with melody, intervals, chords, harmony and much more.

About Dalcroze: Exploring the language of music through movement
From pulse to rhythm, bar time to phrasing, form and structure the language of music can be explored creatively through movement. There are many benefits to doing this:
– the body learns to feel the music and becomes a musical instrument in itself
– we learn how to use the body effectively
– because we learn to feel music more deeply this helps us when we perform
– we learn many additional skills such as reacting quickly, being well coordinated, learning to actively listen
– we work on our own and in pairs and as a group and learn to cooperate and communicate well
It is a way of learning music that has great value for young and old, amateur and professional, singers and players and much more.

Jacqueline Vann studied Dalcroze Eurhythmics at the Institut Jaques-Dalcroze, Geneva from 1994 to 1997. She is Deputy Director of Studies in the UK and is also responsible for the Dalcroze children’s examinations. She is a freelance Dalcroze teacher working with adults, seniors, musicians and non-musicians, children of all ages as well as those with Specific Learning Difficulties. She teaches regularly on the Dalcroze International Summer School and Easter Course as well as the UK’s Foundation, Intermediate, Certificate and Licence training courses.
She gives regular Dalcroze workshops around the country and has taught in Italy, Norway, Denmark, Japan, Hong Kong, Canada, South Korea and Australia.

In 2013, to celebrate the centenary of the London School of Dalcroze Eurhythmics, she gave two papers at the first International Conference of Dalcroze Studies – one on the Dalcroze Children’s Exams and another on the benefits of using Dalcroze to teach children with Specific Learning Difficulties.

Jacqueline now lives in the South West of England. She teaches with Exeter Young Strings, JUTP Music and is currently setting up Dalcroze training at the University of Exeter. She lives on Dartmoor where she also breeds sheep, keeps chickens and pursues another of her passions – horse riding.

Claire McCue

Claire McCue

Take time to breathe
Claire’s afternoon workshop at the Kodály Summer School 2017

On a ten day BKA course, when there will be so much to take in, take time out in this gentle movement and relaxation session. Through mindful movement, simple stretches to ease tight muscles, breathing, and the chance to simply relax and re-focus, you will also be able to take away some more ideas for relaxation through movement, mindfulness, music and meditation for the future.

Claire McCue is a composer, piano teacher and music educator based in Glasgow, also with a background and qualification in Dance teaching, the result of a much-loved hobby. After a “slight diversion” by way of a BSC(Hons) in Maths, Statistics and Management Science, she studied for a BA in Applied Music at Strathclyde University then, after a few years teaching (and discovering Kodaly!), gained a Masters in Composition (Distinction) from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. The Kodaly journey has never stopped since, nor has the composition or love of dance and use of movement in her teaching.

Claire delivers regular musicianship sessions across a range of ages for the RCS Junior Conservatoire and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra Junior Chorus and has co-led an early years training programme for nurseries and Youth Music Initiative tutors for YMI Falkirk Council over the last two years. She teaches piano for RCS early years and privately, and does some workshops for the National Youth Choir of Scotland (NYCoS).

Her compositions and collaborations have won various prizes, been broadcast on BBC radio 3 and performed internationally, and recently she enjoyed combining composition/education worlds in writing some new pentatonic songs for NYCoS. She looks forward to meeting new and familiar faces at the next BKA Summer School.

 

Florent Isoard

Florent IsoardFlorent studied for three years in a jazz school in the South of France. The singing lessons left him hungry for more accurate answers though – and then he discovered Allan Wright.

He liked Allan’s teaching so much that he has been working with him for almost six years, getting his certificate as an associate teacher along the way.  Florent now teaches in music schools, as well as in individual lessons and workshops, all around France.

He specialises in pop music (he is a pop singer) but teaches singers in many other musical genres.