Rhys and Owain Boorman

Rhys and Owain

At the 2017 Kodály Summer School, Rhys and Owain will present a fun and interactive introduction to Cotswold Morris Dance, the most graceful, dynamic and complex of the Morris Dance forms alive in England today. Morris Dancing has easy-to- grasp structures, which are filled with a vocabulary of steps and arm movements distinctive to each “tradition”, and a number of figures and group movements shared between traditions. We will learn one or two accessible dances to explore the beauty of this tradition.

Rhys and Owain Boorman have both been dancing since the age of 12; they are 24 now. Their first side was Mad Jack’s Morris from Hastings, which was their only team for six years before going to university. Since then, Rhys has joined various teams, notably Morris performance group: Morris Offspring and Molly Team: The Seven Champions Molly Dancers. With Morris Offspring he has performed on various stages, including the Royal Albert Hall for the 2014 Folk Awards and has performed in shows in America and Canada.

Owain was just as busy at university, joining and leading two sides in Southampton: Red Stags and King John’s, who dance Border and Cotswold Morris, respectively.  He also formed a new mixed Cotswold side in the Autumn of 2014 called Clausentum Morris.

Rhys and Owain won the famous John Gasson Double Jig Competition in 2015 representing Clausentum, with Owain winning the Solo competition that same year; Rhys was placed 2nd in 2015 and 2016.

Steve Roud

Steve Roud_photoSteve Roud is a retired Local History Librarian and now a freelance writer and researcher specialising in the social history of traditional song and other folkloric topics. His publications include The New Penguin Book of English Folk Songs, The Lore of the Playground, The English Year, and the Penguin Guide to the Superstitions of Britain and Ireland. He is also the creator of the internationally-used Folk Song Index online database.

Gerard Klaassens

Gerard_photoGerard Klaassens lives in Limburg, in the South of Holland. He has a B.Ed. in Music Education and has studied solo singing. Since 1993 he has attended all the International Kodâly Seminars at the Kodály Institute of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music in Kecskemét, Hungary where he has attended many solo singing courses led by Dr.János Klézli and Roland Hadju.

Gerard teaches Kodály Musicianship and recorder at the Myouthic Institute for Art and Culture, Thorn and is also a music teacher at the Music Primary Schools of Hout-Blerick, Montfort and Linne. As a conductor, he directs a children’s choir, an adult choir and a concert band; his adult choir have performed in Poland, Vienna, Salzburg and Baden-Baden.

In Holland he is in demand as a lecturer in Primary Music Education and has given workshops on Kodály teaching at the Utrechts Conservatorim. Last August, he was invited to meet the Minister of Education to discuss music education in the South of Holland. Together with Paul Mestrom he has written a method for recorder based on Kodály principles and is now working on a book about music listening.

Gerard has a great interest in multicultural songs and has travelled (and continues to travel) to many different countries to collect songs.

Nicola Gaines

Nicola Gaines_photo

Exploring Rhythm and Phrasing through 17th Century (Playford) Dances
Nicola’s evening workshop at the BKA Summer School 2017. The workshop aims to combine fun with learning.

Nicola Gaines BPhil(Hons) LISTD CECCHETTI is a specialist performer and teacher of Early Dance.

A graduate of the London College of Dance and Drama, and the Royal Ballet School’s Teachers Training Course, she worked for many years with the late Belinda Quirey MBE. In 1998 she recorded a highly acclaimed video on Baroque dance with Christopher Tudor.

Nicola has worked and performed on numerous educational projects with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. She has also led educational projects for the Victoria & Albert Museum and Viva (East of England Orchestra). Nicola has also delivered workshops for EPTA, BKA and the Purcell School of Music

Nicola is the Dance Leader and Administrator for the Early Dance Faculty of the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dance and has taught and demonstrated Early Dance on numerous courses run for dancers and musicians.

Nicola is also a senior teacher for the Junior Associates Scheme at the Royal Ballet School where she is responsible for the use of Early Dance material in the JA training programme and performances.

Ralph Allwood MBE

Ralph Allwood MBE was for 26 years Director of Music at Eton College and is now a freelance choral director. He is the Director of the Eton Choral Courses, which he founded in 1980. Seven thousand 16 to 20 year olds have been students on courses over the last thirty-five years. He co-founded the Junior Choral Courses in 2012, and is now planning courses in Shanghai, Melbourne and Greenwich, Connecticut. The Rodolfus choir, made up of the best singers from the courses, has been described as ‘unspeakably beautiful’ by Gramophone. It has produced over 20 CDs.

Ralph is a founder and conductor of Inner Voices, a choir made up of singers from state schools in London. He has conducted choirs for 40 live broadcasts for BBC Radio 3, is a judge for the Llangollen Eisteddfod and Cork International Choral Competition and has written much music heard worldwide on radio and television.

Ralph adjudicates the Llangollen Eisteddfod and the Cork International Choral Competition. He is a Fellow Commoner advising in music at Music at Queens’ College, Cambridge, and an Honorary Fellow of University College, Durham. He is Choral Advisor to Novello, Wellington College and Trinity College, Oxford. He teaches at Trinity Laban Conservatoire and at his old school, Tiffin.

In 2012 Ralph was awarded a Doctorate of Music by Aberdeen University. He was made MBE in the 2012 New Year’s Honours list.

Jacqueline Vann

Jacqueline VannDalcroze: using movement in Aural Training
Jacqueline’s afternoon workshop at the Kodály Summer School 2017

This session will look at some of the ways movement is used within the context of an aural training session. Sometimes as an expressive tool, sometimes as a quick reaction game, sometimes as a means of engaging more with the music and sometimes to show the music in space. The class will include games and exercises to do with melody, intervals, chords, harmony and much more.

About Dalcroze: Exploring the language of music through movement
From pulse to rhythm, bar time to phrasing, form and structure the language of music can be explored creatively through movement. There are many benefits to doing this:
– the body learns to feel the music and becomes a musical instrument in itself
– we learn how to use the body effectively
– because we learn to feel music more deeply this helps us when we perform
– we learn many additional skills such as reacting quickly, being well coordinated, learning to actively listen
– we work on our own and in pairs and as a group and learn to cooperate and communicate well
It is a way of learning music that has great value for young and old, amateur and professional, singers and players and much more.

Jacqueline Vann studied Dalcroze Eurhythmics at the Institut Jaques-Dalcroze, Geneva from 1994 to 1997. She is Deputy Director of Studies in the UK and is also responsible for the Dalcroze children’s examinations. She is a freelance Dalcroze teacher working with adults, seniors, musicians and non-musicians, children of all ages as well as those with Specific Learning Difficulties. She teaches regularly on the Dalcroze International Summer School and Easter Course as well as the UK’s Foundation, Intermediate, Certificate and Licence training courses.
She gives regular Dalcroze workshops around the country and has taught in Italy, Norway, Denmark, Japan, Hong Kong, Canada, South Korea and Australia.

In 2013, to celebrate the centenary of the London School of Dalcroze Eurhythmics, she gave two papers at the first International Conference of Dalcroze Studies – one on the Dalcroze Children’s Exams and another on the benefits of using Dalcroze to teach children with Specific Learning Difficulties.

Jacqueline now lives in the South West of England. She teaches with Exeter Young Strings, JUTP Music and is currently setting up Dalcroze training at the University of Exeter. She lives on Dartmoor where she also breeds sheep, keeps chickens and pursues another of her passions – horse riding.

Claire McCue

Claire McCue

Take time to breathe
Claire’s afternoon workshop at the Kodály Summer School 2017

On a ten day BKA course, when there will be so much to take in, take time out in this gentle movement and relaxation session. Through mindful movement, simple stretches to ease tight muscles, breathing, and the chance to simply relax and re-focus, you will also be able to take away some more ideas for relaxation through movement, mindfulness, music and meditation for the future.

Claire McCue is a composer, piano teacher and music educator based in Glasgow, also with a background and qualification in Dance teaching, the result of a much-loved hobby. After a “slight diversion” by way of a BSC(Hons) in Maths, Statistics and Management Science, she studied for a BA in Applied Music at Strathclyde University then, after a few years teaching (and discovering Kodaly!), gained a Masters in Composition (Distinction) from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. The Kodaly journey has never stopped since, nor has the composition or love of dance and use of movement in her teaching.

Claire delivers regular musicianship sessions across a range of ages for the RCS Junior Conservatoire and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra Junior Chorus and has co-led an early years training programme for nurseries and Youth Music Initiative tutors for YMI Falkirk Council over the last two years. She teaches piano for RCS early years and privately, and does some workshops for the National Youth Choir of Scotland (NYCoS).

Her compositions and collaborations have won various prizes, been broadcast on BBC radio 3 and performed internationally, and recently she enjoyed combining composition/education worlds in writing some new pentatonic songs for NYCoS. She looks forward to meeting new and familiar faces at the next BKA Summer School.

 

Len Tyler

Having spent 28 years in army music, 17 of which as the music director of various bands and training establishments, Len decided to change direction, leave the military and become an educator. Having trained with the British Kodály Academy, Colourstrings International and Trinity College of Music he set up his own music school covering the age range 22nd week of pregnancy (when the hearing develops) to upper primary. He is still very active in instrumental work playing in a number of bands and orchestras as well as being the MD of an adult wind band.
Len has been delivering Kodály workshops across the UK for both instrumental and classroom work for many years. CPD days have been provided for whole school staff (including classroom assistants and lunchtime supervisors), instrumental teaching services, choral directors and general workshops on the Kodály approach. He has also run year long adult study classes for the BKA leading to formal qualification.

Len lives in Camberley (Surrey) with his woodwind teacher wife, one grown up daughter (a vet) and three dogs. His other grown up daughter is studying at Kings College (London) and is a regular and welcome visitor.

Florent Isoard

Florent IsoardFlorent studied for three years in a jazz school in the South of France. The singing lessons left him hungry for more accurate answers though – and then he discovered Allan Wright.

He liked Allan’s teaching so much that he has been working with him for almost six years, getting his certificate as an associate teacher along the way.  Florent now teaches in music schools, as well as in individual lessons and workshops, all around France.

He specialises in pop music (he is a pop singer) but teaches singers in many other musical genres.

Mark Penrose

Mark PenroseMark will be teaching Secondary methodology. For more details please visit Kodály Summer School 2016.

Mark is Director of Music at Bilton Grange Preparatory School, a leading boarding school near Rugby. He trained as a teacher with Dr James Cuskelly (IKS President) and Maree Hennessy (Director of the Kodály Centre for Music Education at Holy Names University) at the University of Queensland, graduating with a Bachelor of Education in Secondary and Primary Music in July 2006, having previously gained a Bachelor of Music and a Bachelor of Music Studies (Hons I) in Vocal Pedagogy from the Queensland Conservatorium, Griffith University.

In the UK, Mark has taught from EYFS to A Level, and has been a Head of Department since early 2008, implementing a Kodály-inspired curriculum at each school with great success. Before moving out of London, he was an occasional deputy teacher for the String Training Programme at Junior Guildhall, covering Kodály classes for Cyrilla Rowsell and others. More recently, Mark delivered training on the International A Level in Music (CIE) to teachers in China and on the Isle of Man. He is an experienced examiner for iGCSE, A Level, Pre-U and Singapore Music syllabuses.

As a choral conductor, Mark has met with success in the Barnardo’s National Choral Competition, taking the Junior Chamber Choir at Surbiton High Girls’ Prep School to the National Finals at the Royal Festival Hall in March 2015, and touring to Belgium a few weeks later to première his Pentatonic Mass, which was also performed by the Miraculum Children’s Choir when they visited Surbiton for the second time in July 2015.