Methodology

Four strands of methodology will be offered on this year’s Summer School: Early Childhood, Primary, Secondary and Instrumental – ZeneZen.

What is methodology?

This is the Oxford Dictionary definition: “a set of methods and principles used to perform a particular activity”. It sounds a bit dry.

Absorbing and understanding Kodály’s ideas and philosophy and infusing them into your own teaching can be a long journey, but it’s an exciting one to undertake; full of discovery and ultimately rewarding and enriching for both you and your pupils…..it’s anything but dry.

What is the most important quality for a music teacher to have?

Katalin Körtvési: ” Have a well-trained heart. Teach with your personality and with your passion!”

Kodály himself never wanted his principles enshrined in a single ‘method’ or ‘tutor’ to be religiously followed, but there’s a strong consensus on Kodály principles.

Judith Brindle: ‘When I use the word I mean a singing- based curriculum, progressing from the simplest to the most advanced musicianship, building up a carefully-selected repertoire of songs, through which you teach pulse, rhythm, pitch, expressive elements, musical structure and, ultimately, harmony.’

And these are the words of Zoltán Kodály:

“Teach music and singing at school in such a way that it is not a torture but a joy for the pupil; instil a thirst for finer music……., a thirst which will last for a lifetime”.

“Often a single experience will open the young soul to music for a whole lifetime:

“The characteristics of a good musician can be summarised as follows: 1. A well-trained ear. 2. A well-trained intelligence. 3. A well-trained heart. 4. A well-trained hand. All four must develop together, in constant equilibrium”

 

For further reading click this link: “your questions answered

 

London Adventist Chorale

LAC_photoThe London Adventist Chorale was formed in 1981, to bring together and develop the latent talents of singers from various Seventh-day Adventist Churches. Its current principal conductor is Ken Burton, who has conducted the choir for over two decades.

The choir’s first artistic director was the late John Tolman, who laid out the vision for the choir: high-standard performance of varied and challenging sacred repertoire, with a heavy leaning toward a cappella music. Fundamental to the original vision was that the choir would be of a standard to “stand before kings and queens”, a statement borrowed from a Bible verse.

Throughout its years, under several directors including Derek Hoyte and Tina Brooks, this dream has been realised; the choir has made a strong impact on the choral world internationally through its moving performances, combining, as one music critic put it, “discipline with fervour”. Its repertoire over the years has included music in Hebrew, African-American Spirituals, close harmony, and Western choral music from Renaissance through to new commissions.

The Chorale’s performances have been experienced by tens of millions world-wide on stage, screen, recordings and radio appearances. The choir has performed in most of the UK’s major performance venues. Among the many notable venues and performance are Blenheim Palace in the presence of former US President Bill Clinton, Buckingham Palace on the occasion of Her Majesty the Queen’s Golden Jubilee, Toronto’s Sky Dome before an audience of seventy thousand, and BBC Proms concerts. Its performances very often receive long standing ovations, and one Times reviewer was so taken aback, he wrote in the newspaper that he had found “the perfect choir”.

In 1994, the choir won the prestigious “Choir of The Year” title, and was awarded BBC UK Gospel Choir of the Year by the BBC a year later. Even to the present day, many of the UK’s choral directors have verbally stated that the London Adventist Chorale has had a profound effect and influence on the UK choral scene. By way of example, it is not uncommon to see the inclusion of African-American Spirituals – a genre which has been almost unilaterally preserved in the UK by the Chorale – on choral programmes and in competition repertoire. The choir has worked in collaboration with a number of notable artists including Bryn Terfel CBE, Sir Willard White, Larnelle Harris, Wynton Marsalis, Wilhelmenia Fernandez and Lesley Garrett.

The choir performs yearly Christmas concerts at the Clonter Opera Theatre and celebrity chef Raymond Blanc’s Le Manoir Aux Quat’Saisons. It has also been involved with the Kijani Kenya Trust which raises funds for HIV,Aids and Conservation projects in Kenya, through a high-calibre music festival and ongoing education programme.

Recordings to date include the debut album “Turn Your Eyes Upon Jesus”, “Deep River”, “Steal Away” (EMI), and “Live In Australia”.

Borbála Szirányi

Borbála Szirányi graduated in music education and choral conducting at the Liszt Academy of Music in 1997. In her final academic year, she participated in Professor Peter Erdei’s conducting master course in Oxford.

From 1996 to 2015 she worked at the music school of the Hungarian State Opera House Children’s Choir as classroom music teacher and choir conductor. In 1999 she conducted demonstration lessons for the Kodály Institute.

Since 2000 she has regularly taught as a visiting professor at the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing, where the Kodály programme was launched under her direction. The Conservatory’s female choir and mixed choir were founded with her guidance. They performed several concerts with both Western European and Chinese programmes, worked together with the Chinese conductor, Muhai Tang and released a CD.

In 2000 she was a visiting professor on the Kodály programme at the Holy Names College in Oakland, California. She has conducted Kodály courses in Shanghai (2001), Canton, (2005, 2006), Dublin (2013, 2014), Singapore (2013, 2014) Wales (2015, 2016) and Bucharest (2016).

In 2010, she conducted a choir workshop for the Hong Kong Treble Choir.

Since 2010 she has worked as a teacher at the Kodály Institute of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music and she regularly directs post-graduate courses for Hungarian music teachers. Since 2014 she has also taught at the Kós Károly Általános Iskola as part of the Mintaiskola project led by the Liszt Academy of Music. In this project she and her colleagues experiment with new music methodological techniques based on the Kodály concept in order to refresh and renew Hungarian music pedagogy, making it more adaptable to the 21 st century classroom.

Laurel Swift

Laurel will present an fun and interactive introduction to Cotswold Morris Dance, the most graceful, dynamic and complex of the Morris Dance forms alive in England today. Morris Dancing has easy-to-grasp structures, which are filled with a vocabulary of steps and arm movements distinctive to each “tradition”, and a number of figures and group movements shared between traditions. We will learn one or two accessible dances and explore the musicality of the form.

Laurel Swift is an inspiring instigator of creative new projects and performances rooted in the folk arts.  Laurel has choreographed and devised national touring dance productions for Morris Offspring, co-created and performed Under Her Skin with Debs Newbold, advised theatre & film companies on using folk music and dance material, performed and taught at festivals in the UK and America, founded an organisation to develop youth folk arts projects, teaches and contributes to education projects in London and nationally, and regularly performs with her acts including Ben Moss, Gadarene and The Gloworms.

Photo Credit (Ian Anderson, fRoots)

Free Teacher Training Workshop – 29th & 30th September 2016

York, North Yorkshire

A practical workshop on the application of the Kodály principles to classroom music teaching (Early Childhood and Primary with a strand for instrumental teachers)

Tutor: Len Tyler

Location: Robert Wilkinson Primary Academy, West End, Strensall, York, YO32 5UH

Dates:
Part 1: Thursday 29th September 2016 from 16:00 to 18:30
Part 2: Friday 30th September 2016 from 09:00 to 12:30
Single session attendance by arrangement. Priority give to those attending both sessions.

Who is this workshop for?
Anyone interested in classroom music teaching (preschool and primary). There is no need to be a music reader. This workshop is also suitable for instrumental teachers who want learn the Kodaly principles. Very useful for “whole class” teaching.

What will the workshop include?

  • Use of the basic Kodaly principles
  • Lots of songs, routines, and handouts
  • Examples of easy to produce resources
  • Loads of practical ideas (all tried and tested)

Comments from previous delegates

  • Everything was marvelous and extremely useful
  • All very exciting as my first experience of music teacher training. Loved the practical exercises
  • Having done pre-school music for the last 10 years, and being a professional musician there were surprisingly quite a few things that I hadn’t thought about
  • So many great ideas. It was all useful to me
  • Len was excellent in how he explained the course. Good to listen to and very precise. I enjoyed it immensely.
  • I found Len very inspiring and helpful.

York Kodály Workshop Flyer September 2016

To register your interest or book a place
Contact:Alison Goffin
Email: enquiry@yorkmusicservice.co.uk (marked FAO Allison Goffin)
Phone: 07806 848471

This workshop has been set up specifically to support classroom teachers in preschools and primary schools in York and the surrounding area and is open to all in both the state and private sector. While there is no need to be a music reader to attend this workshop there will be plenty for the music specialist. As the Kodály principles are easy to see in early years and primary this workshop is ideal for any instrumental teacher wanting to find out how this approach works. The composer Zoltán Kodály (1882 – 1967) discovered that music education in his native Hungary was not good, and certainly not as he had personally experienced music as a child. As a result he set out to improve things by seeking out “best practice” around Europe while travelling as a professional musician/composer. It was in 1964 that the Incorporated Society of Music Educators held their annual conference in Budapest. At that event the world saw for the first time the great benefits of music the education system in Hungary. There are now Kodály organisations in many countries including USA, Canada, Australia, UK and of course Hungary.

Why Kodály? – 25th September 2016

Scissett, West Yorkshire

A practical one-day workshop on the application of the Kodály principles to classroom music teaching (Early Childhood and Primary)

Tutor: Len Tyler

Location: Scissett First School, Wakefield Road, Scissett, Huddersfield, HD8 9HR

Who is this workshop for?
Anyone interested in classroom music teaching (preschool and primary). There is no need to be a music reader. This workshop is also suitable for instrumental teachers who want learn the Kodaly principles. Very useful for “whole class” teaching.

What will the day feature?
• Use of the basic Kodaly principles.
• Lots of songs, routines, and handouts.
• Examples of easy to produce resources.
• Loads of practical ideas (all tried and tested)

Comments from previous delegates
• Everything was marvelous and extremely useful
• All very exciting as my first experience of music teacher training. Loved the practical exercises
• Having done pre-school music for the last 10 years, and being a professional musician there were surprisingly quite a few things that I hadn’t thought about
• So many great ideas. It was all useful to me
• Len was excellent in how he explained the course. Good to listen to and very precise. I enjoyed it immensely.
• I found Len very inspiring and helpful.

Cost
£55 (including £25 per day per person discount under the “bring a friend” scheme – otherwise £80)

Why Kodaly Scissett September 2016 Application Form

For more details
Phone: 01276 504666
Email: enquiries@lentylermusicschool.co.uk
Website: www.lentylermusicschool.co.uk

BKA Supported Courses are set up independently by highly skilled and experienced BKA members under the auspices of the BKA. The course fee includes a BKA registration fee which the student can redeem as a voucher for the same amount if attending another regular BKA-run course within one calendar year (i.e. within the next twelve months). Alternatively, the amount of the fee can be redeemed against one or more year’s membership of the BKA starting from the 1 July 2016.

Sight Reading Research – Marion Wood

Marion will be presenting a session on her sight-reading research at the Kodály Summer School 2016.

How do we read music? Music Psychologists have puzzled over why some people become better sight-readers than others, particularly at the piano. Whilst Kodaly-related materials provide careful step by step approaches for singing, one outcome of which is excellent sight-reading, there are few comparable programs for the Piano when it is taught in isolation. The frustration that goes with the struggle to master the notation is a significant factor in students giving up the Piano, or sometimes music altogether.

In this session, I will discuss the results of sight-reading experiments that asked intermediate and excellent pianists to look at three pitches when they appeared on a computer screen and play them as fast as possible on a keyboard. After many repetitions, using both clefs in turn, and changing the key signature approximately every 80 trials, some very interesting patterns emerged.

It seems that we can separate features of piano sight-reading into two general groups: those that have to do with understanding and recognising the fundamental structures of music, and those that result directly from the way music is written down. The Kodaly approach forms an excellent basis for general musicianship, and consequently contributes to good sight-reading, but drawbacks of the actual written notation have been little-studied until now, and are surprisingly evident even in the most accomplished sight-readers of all backgrounds.

Can we use this knowledge to improve the process of learning to sight-read at the Piano (and other instruments)? Or can we begin to adapt our strategies to the particular strengths and weaknesses of different students? Both simple and more radical(!) strategies will be discussed.

Sam Lee Nominated for Folk Awards

The BKA are thrilled to report that one of our Kodály Spring Course 2016 Performers has been nominated for two awards at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards 2016.Sam Lee

Sam Lee is no stranger to award nominations. His debut album Ground of its Own was shortlisted for the Mercury Prize for Album of the Year in 2012.

…a beautiful voice: a rich, sweet, rousing baritone with a soft grain and a tough edge that does justice to the sorrow and graft in these ballads. Crucially he makes the songs his own, delivering Scots, Welsh and Irish lyrics with straight-up English diction and subtly original inflections… The Guardian

The 2016 BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards see him nominated in two categories. Best Folk Singer and Best Traditional Track for Lovely Molly. He will also be performing at the awards ceremony at the Royal Albert Hall.

Congratulations Sam! We can’t wait to meet you and your songs on Tuesday 29th March.

If you would like to come and see Sam you can book a residential or day place at the Spring Course here.

Northern Kodály Choir

Huddersfield, West Yorkshire

Improve your musicianship and practise singing beautiful music in Solfa under the leadership of Nicky Woods.

The choir meet from 2:00pm to 5:00pm on the following dates at St Paul’s Hall, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH

2017
1st October
12th November (guest conductor Lucinda Geoghegan)
3rd December

2018
7th January
4th February
4th March
15th April

Fees: £10 per session (free to University of Huddersfield students)

For more information and to book your place please contact Ben benviola86@gmail.com